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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
and extend the maturity of existing loans. mark carney prepares to take up the reigns of the uk economy any. unlikely to be any good news. third quarter gd figures expected to be revised down. and it's point, click, buy. americans were doing plenty of that yesterdays as early reports suggest online holiday sales soared on cyber monday. and all bets are off. prediction market entrade says it can no longer accept u.s. customers as market regulators say its trades aren't legal. shanghai composite closed below 2,000 for the first time in three years. it comes at a time when plenty have been talking up chinese growth prospects for next year. so we'll get into that more later. but 1991 is the closing level. this the main one to watch across asia. the nikkei did manage to continue it rally adding about 0.4% as the yen weakens on comments this morning. forex, the dollar-yen one to watch, 82.19 is the level there. the aussie dollar doing a little bit abouter despite that weak number on the shanghai composite. sterling is flat. we'll get into that more later. and euro-dollar just barely higher today,
's what gets the economy going at a rate that we haven't yet enjoyed so far in this recovery. >> so why? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with e
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
's really thinking that we're going to get this full 3.5%, 4% gdp hit smack into the economy on january 1st. the problem is that time is marching on. we've had the election, we've had thanksgiving. the excuses are running out. the lame-duck session is only so long. that's probably why the markets are getting nervous. although you may get a deal done in q-1 rather than in q-4, the fact that it actually hits from january 1st is going to keep business very cautious, very defensive and that's going to worry the equity market. >> it's interesting because it also comes against the landscape where we've seen chinese equities underperform, they reminded us very few of its member countries have great growth prospects going forward. that's probably wise. people are saying why is it that across the globe the u.s. fiscal cliff is such an issue. well, it's because sources of growth at this point are few and far between. >> that is the problem. where is growth going to come from. the one place that looked set for a reasonable 2013 was the u.s. economy. europe flat, china slower probably than this year. b
is to talk about the economy. but i would say something is. romney only emphasized -- very quickly. we cannot run only on an economic message. we have the full conservatives on social issues, on the national security, and on the economy. spent and aspirational. aspirational a mechanism where you are free to go as far as you want to go and to do what you want to do. and you are right about the hispanic community, especially they are very and trunk -- entrepreneurial. guess what. they start liking free government less. >> unfortunately, we're out of time to want to thank you all for coming today. please join me in thanking our panelists for this terrific presentation. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> tonight in primetime we get a closer look at the presidential election. we have from president obama's former campaign manager and republican strategist steve smith. that's and university of delaware and starts at 8 p.m. eastern. here on c-span2, author mark friedman talks about how more baby boomers are entering into a second careers. he's the author of the big shi shift. that's also at 8 p
a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we started it. my observation is that canadians are more open to free trade than americans. their message is of protectionism. what are your observations? what do you attribute the difference to? >> in negotiations on trade agreement -- we are and 50 to go she asians. one is with the euro
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental question and up in in this myth that economics draws people together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?" during the cold war, you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and it two blew up, you could still have 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment in figuring out how to court made, communicate, due to escalation and talk if things got bad. in this era, when i look at the amount of time -- the obama administration more so than the bush administration, when officials meet throughout the region, and the discussion attempt to correlate with china, there seems to be a lot of effort to try to coordinate. jim steinberg was the fourth member of this panel, looking at the island dispute and said, they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication, miss assessment, and the dangers of that between china and japan. it raises the question of whether or not -- i agree. i know china wants respect
about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the jobs and economy issue. simply put, immigration reform would create a fair, humane and effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now our immigration system doesn't work for anyone but unscrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those who are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back in the hands of workers and fair and honest employers. if all workers have a legal status, employers can't skirt labor laws said they have to pay fair wages and abide the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working and most honorable people in our society should not have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i'm truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know that
spain to take the bailout, but of course many things can go wrong including the economy could be even worse than what we just discussed. in that case i think spain would ultimately have to apply. but i don't think they'll do that over the coming weeks. >> all right, ricardo, good to talk to you. thanks for that. don't forget, of course, if you have any thoughts, questions, comments, e-mail us at cnbc.com. it's thanksgiving to u.s. markets, so they're closed, so that means we have a special three hour show for european and asian viewers today. still to come, india's parliament has opened its winter's session for what could be a tough first day back to business for the prime minister. we'll find out what opposition he faces from our correspondent in mumbai. we'll also find out why asian casinos are putting their chips on the table despite slow economic growth in the region. and obama saves cobbler, but many of his turkey friends will end up on the table today. we evaluate the cost of a thanksgiving dinner with a soft commodities expert. all of that and lent more coming up over the cours
: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt'
and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next election is going to have to dec
a lot of -- >> he's got a cleaner slate than four years ago with an economy. >> start building the sub structure to show actual progress. a debate in the white house is, like, it's a long term thing, health care, for instance, but showing results any time soon to people in need. well, that was the long term game. of course, the stimulus was the short term game, but, still, americans don't feel the effects. some of it is marketing, some of it is real, of a lot of what obama's done. i think the key now is, because of the re-election, he'll actually have time for americans just to go, well, i feel a little better, and it's substantive, it's real. my health insurance -- >> that was true of clinton, and david said in the conversation that clinton adopt seize the reigns of a -- didn't seize the reigns of a second term. >> seized something else instead. [laughter] [applause] >> that was good. >> the whole year before wasting 1997 before the scandal broke will. >> welfare reform -- >> asking dave because we're in biography here. i'm fascinated by them figuring out who they were in childhood. y
. it is is sapping the ability of the american economy to grow and it is topping -- zapping the ability of the average american to rise. until we look at the major core issues that are making the u.s. more attractive to business, we will go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these will just occur over and over again. we identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find there is broad consensus where we believe these things would really move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two, three, four years. there is some real bipartisan support. the first is the need of a sustainable budget compromise. that is widely accepted by all. two, easing on highly skilled immigration now. yes, when a broader immigration reform, but this is one of the abilities to really move rapidly to inject skills and to the economy and fill jobs badly need to be filled to sustain our growth. it is not a long-term solution and there, but it is a critical step we can take now that would really move the needle. we hav
on skills, giving a big boost to their economies. it's not as if america doesn't need these people. american companies are struggling to fill 3.6 million job opening, many of them in science-related fields. meanwhile foreign students receive half of their doctorates in foreign fields and most all will head home after graduation. new york city mayor michael bloomberg calls it the single biggest problem facing the economy and argues that our current approach is national suicide. the good news is we may finally be on the road to a solution. immigration reform has been a taboo topic for the last few years as large and vocal voices within the republican party with considerable public support have blocked any mention of reform. the words they've wanted to hear are border fence and deportation. that's why mitt romney activated a policy of self-deportation during the prisonal campaign. that's why he lost the spanish vote and asian vote to president obama by a landslide. president obama seems emboldened and the republicans chasened. so we have an opening for a deal. what should it look like? >> well,
to raise taxes on small businesses because it would damage the economy. now he thinks this economy is stronger than it was two years ago and we are in better shape to take the economic hit. it is an interesting question. if you go over the tax cliff and taxes are raised dramatically, the house would have our past -- will already have passed. on the sequester, i thought if republicans won the house and senate of the president say, since it -- sequestration would not happen. it denied give up any of the savings from the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stam
.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing to start. when mike allen and i would've "a patriot's history of the modern world," we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided
1st or 11:59 the day before january 1st. it's already starting to impact the economy. whether it impacts consumers -- and we'll find out today, by the way, in terms of thanksgiving and what's that meant, whether consumers are coming out or not -- but thoorz the bigger issue that manufacturing has already started to slow down. people are starting to worry. it may end up in the economic numbers already, just the fact that we're having this debate. and then come january 1st, do we go over? what does that mean? is it the fiscal cliff? or does it look like the fiscal bungee cord? that's what some people are calling it. we go over for two weeks and then we snap back and get a deal and what does that deal look like? >> a lot of positive talk following the election. even bill kristol talking about let's feel free to raise taxes if it's part of a bigger deal. a lot of elections don't have consequences, midterm elections. this was supposed to be a status quo election. but something happened here. i think the fever is starting to break. >> absolutely. you're going to see it, i think, on
.s. treasury department is now stopping short of labeling the world's second biggest economy a currency manipulator. the white house is expected now to send the congress a multi-billion-dollar request on the recovery from superstorm sandy. the storm caused an estimated $71 billion in damages in new york and new jersey, and some congressional aides saying the request for funding would likely be at least $11 billion. the move comes as canada gets close to its decision on whether to approve the transaction. the energy companies say discussions with the committee are still in progress, and of course they had to file approval because they have extensive operations in the u.s. gulf of mexico. >>> "the wall street journal" reporting that virtue is emerging as the frontrunner to buy knight capital. they would possibly sell off parts of that business. finally, we can't get away from the story of twinkies. the bakers union of hostess brands wants a bankruptcy judge to appoint a chapter 11 trustee to ensure an orderly winddown. the union is saying it objects the allowing incumbent management to su
then spoke of future goals for china, which is already the world's second largest economy. hu spoke bluntly of china's regional aspirations and territorial disputes with japan and other countries. hu jintao served two terms as the communist party secretary general for a total of ten years. what does this decade mean to china? >> china has faced many domestic and diplomatic challenges over the past decade, and the president, hu jintao's leadership. >> hu promoted what he called the concept of scientific development. aimed to create a harmonious society. it will be a process for slower growth. the hu administration avoided a $2-million-year-old tax based on farmers' harvest. it was part of the president's effort to narrow the economic gap between urban and rural areas. hu also worked toward a sweeping consultation of coal mines and chemical plants, which resulted in a reduction in pollution. but the president hasn't been able to control china's income disparity or corruption among its bureaucrats, and so public anger with the government is snarling. migrant workers in cities and students look
president obama's deep cuts will have a deep effect to our economy. he used the word dwast stating. snowing this how could anyone support depleting another $1.8 billion from an already stretched budget? president obama's climate chief defended the green fleet by arguing even a dollar rise in gasoline prices would cost d.o.d. $30 billion. believe my good friend, the senator from colorado said essentially the same thing. i agree with that. if every $1 rise in gas prices cost $30 million, a $27 increase would add up to about $660 million so that argument falls completely flat in realizing the economic angle is a political hoozer the obama administration has tried to say it's about national security in getting off of foreign oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact
the economy toppling back into recession. >> everyone i've had on this program, all the members of congress, have said to me, joanne, we have to get this done, of course it's going to get done. but we should remember it was a year ago today the grand bargain failed. so what's it going to take? >> you know, i think it might take the new congress being seated. i mean, if you think about it, you still have a lame duck congress so, while the election may have changed the atmosphere and sort of the story line for the members, the actual people themselves are still there. so they've not changed their ideologies at all. i think that the problem is that you have john boehner, president and mitch mcconnell negotiating with the exact same congress that they had when they couldn't make a deal the last time. so i think until the personnel change, i'm not sure you can get a deal. >> and juan kessler, the fact checker for "the washington post," has reported that, you know, you have to come from, like, some point point. you have to have a negotiating point to start with. he said democrats and republicans
around. >> okay. >> what else do we have in news? >> we have the economy. we'll begin there now at 4 past the hour. >> we're going to keep reading the post. go ahead. >> the markets look to rebound after stocks finished relatively flat yesterday following a new warning from the central bank about the fiscal cliff. speaking to the economic club of new york, fed chair ben bernanke urged lawmakers to reach a deal to avoid the automatic spending cuts and tax increases. he said going over the fiscal cliff would pose a substantial risk to the economy. according to a new study the fiscal cliff could give 90% of americans new tax bills when the bush tax rates and some by president obama would both end. the working poor would be among the hardest hit. a tax policy center analysis showed a married couple making about $30,000 a year would on average go from receiving a $15 tax credit to owing $1400. >> wow. >> yeah. that's probably a reason to try and get something done? >> maybe we will. maybe we will. >> you would think. >> yeah. or maybe we can just talk about 2016. >> we could do that as well. h
have on the economy and consumer spending. increased taxes could cut consumer spending spite $200 billion. -- consumer spending by $200 billion. what it can take all negotiations over the sequestered, we are focusing and the beginnings of the debate on the national debt in prime time. we will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and news conferences from congress and the white house surrounding the passage of the budget control act. the law created automatic spending cuts set to take effect in january along with expiring tax provisions, part of the so- called fiscal cliff. that is tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span. congress returns from a week long thanksgiving break this week. the house is back tomorrow to debate a number of bills. a major bill comes up on thursday when they will consider a visa program for students getting advanced degrees and computer science, engineering and mathematics. off the floor, democrats plan to let new leadership. that is scheduled for thursday. you can see the house tomorrow on c-span. the senate is back today at 2:00 eastern.
. >> that is what is interesting. you have two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmarish situation that raises the fundamental question. that draws people closer together. part of the title today is mischief and miscalculation. what was really interesting if you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviet end of two of them well, you could still have 15 others. there is a lot of heavy investment and how to talk about things like that and in this era, when i look at the amount of time, particularly in the obama administration, if you look at senior officials go to asia throughout the region and they have meetings or others and also the discussion that tends to coordinate with china, there seems to be a lot of efforts try to coordinate. looking out the value of the in the dispute and said that they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication and assessment and the dangers of that between china and japan. so raises the question of whether or not -- i agree with you. i know china wants respect. but whether or not what you are seeing is a strategic or taxa
, getting reform on wall street that doesn't -- that works. doesn't make our economy vulnerable to the gambles of people in our society. finding a way to address the fundamental debt crisis that will burden our children and our children's children and our children's children's children. if you don't fundamentally change the way these elections are financed, you're going to keep getting candidates who are in favor of their funders. of course! >> cenk: there was just a poll done where 67% of americans said politicians need to do something about climate change. they need to take legislative action. only 25% said no. don't do anything. 67% to 25%. if we had a functioning democracy, there would be immediate action on that. but in reality there is not a peep. so i've been covering politics for about 17 years now. the reason that i'm passionate about campaign finance reform is it is the rosetta stone of politics. if you want to know who's going to win on any given issue it always comes back to the same thing. follow
economies in the world. the u.s. and china share a lot of interests and most importantly people in both countries share an interest in for example dealing with climate change. something that neither government is not the chinese are u.s. government are prepared to move strongly enough to change. when we talk about pivoting in the context of sending the troops, that doesn't help when we are trying to do with what should we be doing about climate change. i think what we really need is a pivot away from the military being the centerpiece of our diplomatic shift and a shift towards engagement with people at an entirely different level. >> host: a recent study by the brand company in the project for the air force talked about u.s. overseas military presence and the strategic choices that the government has to make. one of the comments in that report says, the u.s. has to decide whether china and the united states should rely primarily on u.s. space forces to respond to global crises and conflicts keeping only a small group of presence to reassure allies and partners. such a choice would be b
their economy and not be governed by a set of ideological imper it was. >> rose: said another way, morsi government has to prove it can govern? >> it does have to prove it can govern. one of the things that is interesting you do have leaderships now that do have to pay attention to their public, their republicans have expectations and needs and hopes, and one of those is that, in fact the needs of the public will be addressed. >> rose: is it possible coming out of this is something positive in terms of future relationship between palestinians and israelis and between israelis and new arab governments? is that possible here? >> it helps the relationship -- egypt and israel. they have worked together pretty well, it also improved the relationship between netanyahu government and our own government. they have worked together pretty well over the last week as well. >> rose: do you agree with that, dennis, we are looking at where there was a fractured relationship it might be getting better? >> i do, i think one of the most significant things is that you have a very different egyptian govern
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)